How does sport help people who have dementia?

From the AFTD web site:

“Featured on BBC Sport, the activity level of people battling dementia is explored. Specifically, the story of Malcolm Watt, a professional tennis player prior to being diagnosed with dementia aged 42, is told. It explains how although he has lost his ability to communicate, he can still play tennis like a pro. Read the entire article here.”

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FTD Caregiver Support Group Meeting, June 12th

Date: Sunday, June 12th, 1:00-2:30pm (meeting the second Sunday of the month due to Father’s Day being on the third Sunday)   

Location: Arden Courts Memory Care, 45 South Rd, Farmington, CT.

The CT FTD Foundation has a support group meeting for all caregiver’s and families/friends who have a loved one diagnosed with Frontotemporal Degeneration (FTD).

Courtyard-003The support group meetings are a chance for everyone to share their experiences and express concerns. It also gives a chance to share ideas that have worked for other caregivers going through the same experience. Meetings are informal.

You are welcome to bring your loved one with FTD, Arden Courts will provide respite care in a separate room. Please just let us know in advance if your loved one will attend.

Meetings are the third Sunday of every month at Arden Courts Memory Care, 45 South Rd, Farmington, CT. Time: 1:00pm – 2:30pm. Hosted by the CT FTD Foundation, meetings are free. For more information contact info@ctftdfoundation.org.

The Longest Day – June 20, 2016 – Fund Raiser

From the Alzheimer’s CT Chapter:

Long day“The Longest Day is a team event to raise funds and awareness for the Alzheimer’s Association®. Held annually on the summer solstice, the duration of this sunrise-to-sunset event symbolizes the challenging journey of those living with the disease and their caregivers. Teams are encouraged to create their own experience as they fundraise and participate in an activity they love to honor someone facing the disease.”

For more information go to http://act.alz.org/site/TR?fr_id=8480&pg=informational&sid=22697

AD-Related Dementias Summit 2016: Progress, Aims, Dollars

Frontotemporal Degeneration was included in the discussion at the Alzheimer’s Disease-Related Dementias (ADRD) 2016 summit held March 29 to 30 at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, Maryland.

The meeting itself followed six months of preparation, during which about 80 leading scientists, physicians, and administrators were convened around topics and disease areas. At the summit, the scientists in these working groups, plus invited experts from several European countries, reported on progress the field had made since 2013.

Here are a couple of excerpts as they pertain to FTD. See page 2 of the ALZFORUM report for more about the research into FTD.

“Because non-AD dementias tend to languish outside the Alzheimer’s spotlight, they can benefit most strongly from the work of dedicated non-governmental organizations, said Susan Dickinson of the Association for Frontotemporal Degeneration (AFTD), Radnor, Pennsylvania. For one thing, these groups draw patients and caregivers into research through education and registries, Dickinson said. “We bring them to the table, get their buy-in on research programs, and get them to inform [study] design,” she told the audience. AFTD is building an FTD Disorders Registry to collect data from patients and caregivers who want to participate in research to accelerate recruitment for clinical trials. AFTD also conducts research. For example, a soon-to-be-published economic burden study estimates the cost FTD imposes on families and society at large. Having these numbers will strengthen researchers’ FTD grant applications, Dickinson said. She particularly emphasized that NGOs should not compete but collaborate in their shared interests, which has not always been the case among dementia philanthropies.”

“Following a string of genetic discoveries, scientists are now in the midst of an explosion of work to discover the mechanisms of disease in this especially diverse group of disorders. “We are understanding the pathways involved in more detail than ever before,” said David Holtzman, Washington University in St. Louis. Many researchers agreed broadly that progress in the molecular biology of FTD is so rapid they are having trouble keeping up.”

Source: ALZFORUM

FTD Caregiver Support Group Meeting, May 15th

Date: Sunday, May 15th, 1:00-2:30pm

Location: Arden Courts Memory Care, 45 South Rd, Farmington, CT. A little over an hour from the Norwalk area.

The CT FTD Foundation has a support group meeting for all caregiver’s and families/friends who have a loved one diagnosed with Frontotemporal Degeneration (FTD).

Courtyard-003The support group meetings are a chance for everyone to share their experiences and express concerns. It also gives a chance to share ideas that have worked for other caregivers going through the same experience. Meetings are informal.

You are welcome to bring your loved one with FTD, Arden Courts will provide respite care in a separate room. Please just let us know in advance if your loved one will attend.

Meetings are the third Sunday of every month at Arden Courts Memory Care, 45 South Rd, Farmington, CT. Time: 1:00pm – 2:30pm. Hosted by the CT FTD Foundation, meetings are free. For more information contact info@ctftdfoundation.org.