A glossary of FTD and Alzheimer’s related neurological terms

ftd-talkWouldn’t it be nice to have a place to go to get a brief description of terms like Aphasia, Acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, Dysphagia, Executive function, Lumbar puncture, Neuroleptic drugs, Tau, and many more terms we hear about.

Well there is.

FTDtalk, run by a group of scientists investigating FTD at the University College London Institute of Neurology in the UK, put together a glossary. Thank you scientists!

Go to www.ftdtalk.org/glossary/

Strategies for the Holidays from Caregiver.com

“The holidays can be a time of renewal – renewal of friendships through visits and cards, cgrenewal of family relationships through gatherings and shared meals, and renewal of one’s faith. But the holidays also are a time that can be particularly challenging for a caregiver. It is a time during which the changes in one’s life are highlighted and there are additional demands placed upon on an already stressed life.” Read more …

“Still Alice” Movie Screening in Westport

I just found out about this today. It is open to the public.

Thursday, March 10, 2016 | 4:30pm – 6:30pm

Westport Center for Senior Activities
21 Imperial Avenue
Westport CT 06880

If you are not familiar with the movie ….

“Still Alice,” is a movie that gives us a rare window into the experience of living with Alzheimer’s disease—a glimpse of the inside looking out.

Dr. Alice Howland (Julianne Moore), a renowned linguistics professor, starts to forget words. When she receives a diagnosis of younger-onset Alzheimer’s disease, Alice and her family find their bonds thoroughly tested. Her struggle to stay connected to who she once was is frightening, heartbreaking and inspiring.

The screening is sponsored in part by the CT Chapter of the Alzheimer’s Association and representatives will be there for a discussion and to answer questions.

 

FTD Seminar in New York City

Frontotemporal Degeneration (FTD): The Dementia No One Knows About

  • Symptoms and behaviors of FTD
  • How FTD differs from Alzheimer’s
  • What your healthcare professionals will look for, to pinpoint the disease
  • How genetics plays a role in FTD

Speakers:

Dr. Edward Huey, Assistant Professor of Psychiatry & NeuFlyer tnrology, Columbia University

and

Jill Goldman, MS, MPhil, CGC, Senior Staff Associate & Genetic Counselor, Columbia University

Registration required. See March 14 FTD Seminar Flyer for details.

 

Caregiver Support Group at the Norwalk Senior Center – May 28th

Date: May 28th, 10:30 to 11:30am

Location: Norwalk Senior Center, 11 Allen Road, Norwalk

The Caregiver Support Group at the Norwalk Senior Center is for caregivers of family members or friends diagnosed with Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s or Dementia.

The group offers caregivers an opportunity to share their experiences, help others by sharing their ideas, find out about resources and information thatNSC Photomight be helpful. Meetings are friendly and informal. Occasionally there are themes and guest speakers.

Meetings are on the second and fourth Thursdays of the month. At the first meeting of the month, there are usually Dementia Care Specialists from Wilton Meadows who provide activities for loved ones while caregivers meet. Please call to confirm before bringing your loved one.

Hosted by Lynn Westfield, the group is free and open to all. Membership in the Senior Center is not required.

For more information or if you are interested in participating, please call Lynn at (203) 847-3115 ext.108 or send an email to her at mow@norwalksc.org.

Financial decision makers and dementia

Came across this article on Forbes. I’ve heard stories in the support groups about money lost due to dementia, either by errors in judgement or by bad guys taking advantage.

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A Stunning Study On Dementia, Couples And Money

“The study of Americans over 50 and their spouses between 1998 through 2008, by economists Joanne W. Hsu of the Federal Reserve Board and Robert Willis of the University of Michigan found that as cognition declines for the “financial decision maker,” money management is eventually turned over to his (or her) “cognitively intact” spouse. No surprise there.

But Hsu and Willis said that handoff from the dementia victim often doesn’t  happen until “well after difficulties handling money have already emerged” and “even after he is aware of his difficulties handling money or has even received a diagnosis of a memory-related disease.” 

The full article at http://www.forbes.com/sites/nextavenue/2014/04/30/a-stunning-study-on-dementia-couples-and-money/

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